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NYUAD Barzakh Festival - 2018


Barzakh Festival - 2018

A Festival of World Music

47SOUL and Pedro Coquenão /

Batida - Barzakh Festival

Diverse global cultural streams come together on 1 stage for 2 days

When / 47SOUL and Pedro Coquenão / Batida on Wednesday, Feb 28 @ 7:30pm | RAM, The Ex + Fendika, and Al Nuban Folklore Troupe on Thursday, Mar 1 @ 7:30pm

Where / The Red Theater

 Barzakh Festival – Day 1 – 47SOUL and Pedro Coquenão / Batida  A musical meeting place of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.  Barzakh Festival – There’s a place in the sea where salt and sweet water meet and coexist, but don’t dilute one another…barzakh. The two-day Barzakh Festival draws inspiration from this idea to create a meeting place of musical streams of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.   “Picking a favorite from this swathe of divergent talents is both foolhardy and arrogant – and would be missing the point of Barzakh entirely. It seems impossible anyone who attended either day did not leave without their eyes opened, and their mind broadened.”  – Rob Garratt, The National (UAE)   Wednesday, Feb 28 @ 7:30pm   47SOUL blasts electro Arabic Dabke sound through underground music scenes.  Pedro Coquenão / Batida combines old 1970s Angolan sounds with modern electronic dance music.   47SOUL  blasts their Electro Arabic Dabke (Shamstep) sound through underground music scenes, rapidly amassing fans in the Arab World and Europe since they were formed in Amman, Jordan in 2013. On top of the beats that have been bumping in the Arab World for centuries, 47SOUL hypes it up with analog synthesizers, hypnotic guitar lines, and shattering verses from the four singers. Every show ends in relentless dance and trance from all parties involved. The members — Z the People (vocals & synths), El Far3i (darbouka, MC/Vocals), Walaa Sbeit (percussion, MC/vocals), and El Jehaz (guitar & vocals) — are rooted in Bilad Al-Sham, spanning the divides from Amman to the Galilee to Ramallah and the rest of the Palestinian Diaspora. Their lyrics, mixing Arabic and English, call for celebration and freedom in the struggle for equality, inside Bilad Al Sham and throughout the world.   Pedro Coquenão  is better known in the musical scene as  Batida , the name for the radio show he created 10 years ago on the National Portuguese Radio and RDP Africa, to share news from the Afrotronic music scene. Soon it became the name for an artistic universe that he has developed, featuring music at the center, with records made of own compositions released on Soundway Records, remixes for favorite artists, and shows presented on hundreds of stages across the world. In addition to music, Pedro’s show features homemade objects and instruments, dance, and video, all tools in a constant search for reconstruction / deconstruction of his memory, experiences, and interactions.   “delivered with a brilliant imagination and intelligence and the flux between trad Angola and modern electronic music and the direct communication of hip hop is a great fusion that cranks the past into the future without either discipline losing its edge…potent brew of hip hop, shimmering Angolan music, fractured beats and deep dub bass into a new music all of his own.”  – Louder than War  Pedro has already played in festivals like Central Park Summerstage (US), globalFEST (US), Glastonbury (UK), Womad (UK), Roskilde, (Transmusicalles (FR), Les Nuits Sonore (FR) and Eurockéennes (FR), and venues and arts center like Lincoln Center (US), The Kennedy Center (US) and the Cleveland Museum of Arts (US), among many others.  Batida’s show was featured in the August 2015 edition of Les InRockuptibles magazine as one of that year best shows. Maxime de Abreu described it as “ A show completely out of format, classy and fascinating from beginning to end. Images, dance, music, staging and committed discourse here is more of the same, while mixes and invents a language in itself – that of Batida.”   “It’s just on another level in terms of how he presents his show, how he approaches his music making, whether he is DJing or performing live, or adding visuals, philosophically just how he goes about his business.”- Gilles Peterson – BBC6 Music

Barzakh Festival – Day 1 – 47SOUL and Pedro Coquenão / Batida

A musical meeting place of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.

Barzakh Festival – There’s a place in the sea where salt and sweet water meet and coexist, but don’t dilute one another…barzakh. The two-day Barzakh Festival draws inspiration from this idea to create a meeting place of musical streams of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.

“Picking a favorite from this swathe of divergent talents is both foolhardy and arrogant – and would be missing the point of Barzakh entirely. It seems impossible anyone who attended either day did not leave without their eyes opened, and their mind broadened.” – Rob Garratt, The National (UAE)

Wednesday, Feb 28 @ 7:30pm

47SOUL blasts electro Arabic Dabke sound through underground music scenes.

Pedro Coquenão / Batida combines old 1970s Angolan sounds with modern electronic dance music.

47SOUL blasts their Electro Arabic Dabke (Shamstep) sound through underground music scenes, rapidly amassing fans in the Arab World and Europe since they were formed in Amman, Jordan in 2013. On top of the beats that have been bumping in the Arab World for centuries, 47SOUL hypes it up with analog synthesizers, hypnotic guitar lines, and shattering verses from the four singers. Every show ends in relentless dance and trance from all parties involved. The members — Z the People (vocals & synths), El Far3i (darbouka, MC/Vocals), Walaa Sbeit (percussion, MC/vocals), and El Jehaz (guitar & vocals) — are rooted in Bilad Al-Sham, spanning the divides from Amman to the Galilee to Ramallah and the rest of the Palestinian Diaspora. Their lyrics, mixing Arabic and English, call for celebration and freedom in the struggle for equality, inside Bilad Al Sham and throughout the world.

Pedro Coquenão is better known in the musical scene as Batida, the name for the radio show he created 10 years ago on the National Portuguese Radio and RDP Africa, to share news from the Afrotronic music scene. Soon it became the name for an artistic universe that he has developed, featuring music at the center, with records made of own compositions released on Soundway Records, remixes for favorite artists, and shows presented on hundreds of stages across the world. In addition to music, Pedro’s show features homemade objects and instruments, dance, and video, all tools in a constant search for reconstruction / deconstruction of his memory, experiences, and interactions.

“delivered with a brilliant imagination and intelligence and the flux between trad Angola and modern electronic music and the direct communication of hip hop is a great fusion that cranks the past into the future without either discipline losing its edge…potent brew of hip hop, shimmering Angolan music, fractured beats and deep dub bass into a new music all of his own.” – Louder than War

Pedro has already played in festivals like Central Park Summerstage (US), globalFEST (US), Glastonbury (UK), Womad (UK), Roskilde, (Transmusicalles (FR), Les Nuits Sonore (FR) and Eurockéennes (FR), and venues and arts center like Lincoln Center (US), The Kennedy Center (US) and the Cleveland Museum of Arts (US), among many others.

Batida’s show was featured in the August 2015 edition of Les InRockuptibles magazine as one of that year best shows. Maxime de Abreu described it as “A show completely out of format, classy and fascinating from beginning to end. Images, dance, music, staging and committed discourse here is more of the same, while mixes and invents a language in itself – that of Batida.”

“It’s just on another level in terms of how he presents his show, how he approaches his music making, whether he is DJing or performing live, or adding visuals, philosophically just how he goes about his business.”- Gilles Peterson – BBC6 Music

Barzakh Festival – Day 2 – RAM, The Ex + Fendika, and Al Nuban Folklore Troupe

RAM-The-Ex-and-Fendika-Al-Nuban-Folklore-Troupe-Barzakh-Festival.jpg

A musical meeting place of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.

Barzakh Festival – There’s a place in the sea where salt and sweet water meet and coexist, but don’t dilute one another…barzakh. The two-day Barzakh Festival draws inspiration from this idea to create a meeting place of musical streams of genre-shattering artists from diverse cultures, whose global-minded music reflects multiple influences and recombinant identities.

Thursday, Mar 1 @ 7:30pm

  • Haiti’s RAM powerfully blend rock, traditional Haitian sounds, and vibrant voudou rhythms and lyrics.
  • A stunning collaboration between legendary Dutch punk adventurers The Ex + Fendika, Ethiopia’s pre-eminent traditional dancers and musicians.
  • Al Nuban Folklore Troupe – Preserving an Afro-Emirati tradition with nearly 20 dancers, accompanied by a tanboura, drums, manjour, and call and response vocals.

RAM powerfully blend rock with traditional Afro-Haitian sounds and lyrics, fueled by ceremonial vodou rhythms, driving street music, syncopated rara horns, and searing punk-inflected electric guitars. In an era when many Haitian artists have felt forced to flee the troubled island, RAM still plays regular Thursday night shows at the historic Hotel Oloffson in downtown Port-au-Prince. RAM first gained worldwide attention in 1993, when its song “Ibo Lele (Dreams Come True)” was included in the soundtrack to Jonathan Demme’s film Philadelphia. Their latest album RAM 6: Manmanm Se Ginen, was mixed by Grammy Award winning producer Andrew Weiss, who is working with them on their forthcoming RAM 7.

“Tradition is honored, preserved, and innovated all at the same time, uplifting the people during these troubled times…[a] one-of-a-kind experiences — hypnotic drums, transfixing horns, shredding guitars, riveting dancers. Spirits are soaring” – Vice Noisey

The Ex + Fendika – A stunning collaboration between legendary Dutch adventurers The Ex + Fendika, Ethiopia’s pre-eminent dancers and acoustic musicians.

Born out of the punk explosion in 1979, when anything and everything was possible, Amsterdam’s The Ex has been at the forefront of adventurous music for nearly four decades. The legendary band pretty much play anywhere in the world, and have a deep ongoing collaboration with Ethiopian musicians and dancers. Fendika consists of some of the best traditional Azmari (griot-like storyteller) musicians and dancers, led by the remarkable eskista dancer and cultural entrepreneur Melaku Belay, impresario of Addis Ababa’s influential night spot, Fendika Azmari Bet. Melaku + The Ex first collaborated together with Ethiopia’s legendary late saxophonist Getatchew Mekuria over a decade ago. Since then, their partnership has expanded, with numerous tours, an album and a 7” single featuring the typical Ex rhythms and riffs, combined with traditional instruments (one string masinko, krar, kebero drums) and powerhouse vocals.

“The Ex are legends in their country, and after witnessing such beautiful expression of art crossing borders of genre, nationality, and style, it’s easy to see why.” – Consequence of Sound

“Melaku Belay, an electrifying dancer and in many ways the Ethiopian cultural ambassador of the hour” – Afropop Worldwide

Al Nuban Folklore Troupe

Al Nuban are one of the last groups dedicated to the ancient Afro-Emirati tradition, which traces its roots to Sudan and used to be one of the must-have fixtures at celebrations, weddings, sports competitions’ and significant events in Dubai. Led by Taher Ismael, two lines of nearly 20 dancers face one another to “play”, accompanied by a tanboura, drums, manjour, and call and response vocals.

“The scene is one unchanged for generations: the male and female dancers face each other and move in steps in rows while dancing and singing to the rhythm of a stringed instrument, the tanbourah. Drums beat in a mesmerising tempo and accompany the swishing of the manjur, which is made of cloth with goat hooves sewn onto it. It is a remarkable, one-of-a-kind musical instrument, tied around a dancer’s hip, creating a swishing sound as the performer sways to the rhythm of the music, dictating the pace for the dancers… Ismail is considered [Nuban’s] last maestro…his haunting performances of the Nuban have been immortalised in a series of recordings by the Sharjah cultural department” – The National